Volume 2, Issue 2, December 2018, Page: 30-34
Anaemia in Expectant Mothers Presenting at Mabvuku Polyclinic Zimbabwe
Chiedza Munashe Chaza, Department of Health Sciences, College of Health, Agriculture and Natural Sciences, Africa University, Mutare, Zimbabwe
Sungano Mharakurwa, Department of Health, Africa University, Mutare, Zimbabwe
Received: Sep. 5, 2018;       Accepted: Sep. 18, 2018;       Published: Oct. 23, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.plm.20180202.11      View  132      Downloads  12
Abstract
Anaemia is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes including maternal mortality, preterm delivery and low birth weight and is most prevalent in developing countries. The burden of anemia in pregnancy still remains poorly estimated and is a major concern in endemic countries including Zimbabwe. The general objective of the current study was to ascertain the magnitude of the anaemia in pregnant women attending Mabvuku Polyclinic from June 2017 to August 2017. The study was a cross-sectional design and conducted at Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital (BRIDH) laboratory which processes antenatal samples from Mabvuku Polyclinic. Of 249 expectant mothers included in the study, it was found that 72 (28.9%) were anaemic. Severe anaemia (Hb <7g/dl) occurred in 9 (3.61%), moderate anaemia (Hb 7 - 9.9 g/dl) in 36 (14.6%) and mild anaemia (Hb 10 - 10.9g/dl) in 27 (10.8%) of the presenting expectant mothers. The most common type of anaemia was microcytic hypochromic anaemia (32.1%). There was no significant difference in prevalence of anaemia by age-group or gravidity status among the expectant mothers. It was concluded that there was a high prevalence of anaemia in pregnancy affecting nearly one in every three expectant mothers presenting for antenatal care at Mabvuku Polyclinic. Targeted preventive measures are recommended for all expectant mothers such as prophylactic iron and vitamin supplementation.
Keywords
Anaemia, Pregnancy, Prevalence, Severity, Gravida
To cite this article
Chiedza Munashe Chaza, Sungano Mharakurwa, Anaemia in Expectant Mothers Presenting at Mabvuku Polyclinic Zimbabwe, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2018, pp. 30-34. doi: 10.11648/j.plm.20180202.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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